Tag Archives: Haggai

Through the Bible, June 15

Reading: Haggai 1-2

Summary: Haggai, along with Zechariah, is named in Ezra 5:1 in connection with Zerubbabel’s efforts to rebuild the temple.  Prophets have been sent to deliver God’s message to nations, cities, and kings.  Haggai is sent specifically to leaders of the Jewish people attempting to re-occupy Jerusalem to remind them that it is time to rebuild the house of the Lord.

Devotional Thought:

It’s Not Complicated

God’s expectations of humanity are not difficult.  We really can—and must—know what God wants.  The Bible makes these things rather explicit and clear.

“Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man” (Ecc. 12:13).

Fear God and obey God–simple enough.

That’s what happened as a result of the message of the prophet Haggai: “…the people obeyed the voice of the Lord their God…and the people feared the Lord” (Hag. 1:12).

Here’s the thing, obedience without fear is worthless.  Fear (reverence) without obedience is no fear.  Fear God and obey God.

But what about love? you ask.  Fair enough.

The Bible is also explicit and clear about this too.  Jesus calls it the “great and first commandment” (Matt. 22:37-38): “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might” (Deut. 6:5).

Remember too that “If you love me you will keep my commandments” (John 14:15).

Love God and obey God.  The same holds true for this pair as well; one without the other is not real or valid.

Fear God.  Love God.  Obey God.

It’s not multiple choice.  It’s not mix ’n’ match.  It’s not pick and choose.

June Week 3 Bible Reading Introduction

Week 3: The Jews’ Saga Continues in Both Jerusalem and Persia

June 15-21

         The post-Babylonian captivity story of the Israelites continues on two fronts. In Jerusalem the people have become comfortable, having turned their attention from God’s house to their own homes.  Haggai and Zechariah play important roles in getting the people back on track for the task on which they are to focus.

Meanwhile, back in Persia, an amazing drama is unfolding in which by the incredible providential work of God, a beautiful Jewess, Esther, assumes a most unlikely position as queen.  From there she is able to literally save the Israelite people from extermination.

June Bible Reading Introduction

June Bible Reading Introduction

Old Testament History Ends

Captivity and Restoration

Books: Daniel, Ezekiel, Lamentations, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi

Old Testament history concludes with God’s people being restored to their homeland and rebuild their nation. It is of great interest to note that when given the opportunity, the majority of the Jewish nation did not return but remained in the lands where they had settled. But, many did return. And as the deportation of htejs3ws from Jerusalem and Judah had taken place in stages, so also would the return occur in stages.

Great emphasis is given in both the historical accounts and the prophetic messages of this time to the future glories of the Messianic kingdom.  It is of no small significance, that the highly symbolic New Testament book of Revelation relies heavily on the language and imagery portrayed in Ezekiel, Daniel, and Zechariah (as well as many other Old Testament books) to convey the message of hope in the eternal kingdom of God.

This closing phase of the Old Testament’s record really does set the stage for much of what we encounter with the Jewish people in the New Testament. We find that more of them live outside of Palestine than in it. Also, there’s a greatly heightened sense of expectation for God’s work among them in sending a Messiah. Further, there’s a decidedly different attitude toward the Law and the gods of the nations, both of which had contributed so directly to their downfall and captivity.

It’s Not Complicated

Devotional Text: Haggai 1:12

God’s expectations of humanity are not difficult.  We really can—and must—know what God wants.  The Bible makes these things rather explicit and clear.

“Fear God and keep his commandments, for this is the whole duty of man” (Ecc. 12:13).

Fear God and obey God. Simple enough.

That’s what happened as a result of the message of the prophet Haggai: “…the people obeyed the voice of the Lord their God…and the people feared the Lord” (Hag. 1:12).

Here’s the thing, obedience without fear is worthless.  Fear (reverence) without obedience is no fear.  Fear God and obey God.

But what about love? you ask.  Fair enough.

The Bible is also explicit and clear about this too.  Jesus calls it the “great and first commandment” (Matt. 22:37-38): “You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your might” (Deut. 6:5).

Remember too that “If you love me you will keep my commandments” (John 14:15).

Love God and obey God.  The same holds true for this pair as well; one without the other is not real or valid.

Fear God.  Love God.  Obey God.

It’s not multiple choice.  It’s not mix ’n’ match.  It’s not pick and choose.

–David Deffenbaugh

For today’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

June 15 Bible Reading: Haggai 1-2

Haggai, along with Zechariah, is named in Ezra 5:1 in connection with Zerubbabel’s efforts to rebuild the temple.  Prophets have been sent to deliver God’s message to nations, cities, and kings.  Haggai is sent specifically to leaders of the Jewish people attempting to re-occupy Jerusalem to remind them that it is time to rebuild the house of the Lord.

For today’s daily devotional CLICK HERE

For June week 3 Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

For June’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

June Week 3 Bible Reading Introduction

Week 3: The Jews’ Saga Continues in Both Jerusalem and Persia
June 15-21

The post Babylonian captivity story of the Israelites continues on two fronts.

In Jerusalem the people have become comfortable, having turned their attention from God’s house to their own homes.  Haggai and Zechariah play important roles in getting the people back on track for the task on which they are to focus.

Meanwhile, back in Persia, an amazing drama is unfolding in which by the incredible providential work of God a beautiful Jewess, Esther, assumes a most unlikely position as queen.  From there she is able literally save the Israelite people from extermination.

For June’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

June 13 Bible Reading: Ezra 4-6

The work of the Jews returned to Jerusalem under the leadership of Zerubbabel was not without opposition.  As a matter of fact their efforts were legally stopped based on complaints sent back to the king of Persia.

Eventually, the original decree of king Cyrus was located and the work was allowed to resume.  But, the delay had lulled the people into inactivity and the efforts of the prophets Haggai and Zechariah (June 15-17 readings) were enlisted to motivate them to focus their efforts on God’s house.

For today’s daily devotional CLICK HERE

For June week 2 Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

For June’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

June Bible Reading Introduction

June Bible Reading Introduction
Old Testament History Ends
Captivity and Restoration

Books: Ezekiel, Daniel, Lamentations, Ezra, Nehemiah, Esther, Haggai, Zechariah, Malachi

Old Testament history concludes with God’s people being restored to their homeland and to rebuild their nation.  It is of great interest to note that when given the opportunity, the majority of the Jewish nation did not return but remained in the lands where they had settled.  But, many did return.  And as the deportation of the Jews from Jerusalem and Judah had taken place in stages, so also would the return occur in stages.

Great emphasis is given in both the historical accounts and the prophetic messages of this time to the future glories of the Messianic kingdom.  It is of no small significance that the highly symbolic New Testament book of Revelation relies heavily on the language and imagery portrayed in Ezekiel, Daniel, and Zechariah (as well as many other Old Testament books) to convey the message of hope in the eternal kingdom of God.

This closing phase of the Old Testament’s record really does set the stage for much of what we encounter with the Jewish people in the New Testament; more of them live outside of Palestine than in it, a greatly heightened sense of expectation for God’s work among them in sending a Messiah, and a decidedly different attitude toward the Law and the gods of the nations, both of which had contributed so directly to their downfall and captivity.

–David Deffenbaugh