Tag Archives: speech

Through the Bible, September 9

Reading:  James 3-5

Summary: The “practical gospel” continues by addressing the matters of the Christians speech, divine wisdom, worldliness, dangers of wealth, suffering, and prayer.  This letter demonstrates that much of the New Testament’s contents are not only relating historical events or doctrinal content, but making practical application of Christianity to daily life.

Devotional Thought:

The Surprising Path to Spiritual Excellence

The gulf is quite expansive that spans the difference between my talents and abilities and those of a professional athlete, musician, painter, etc. They are what they are because they possess and exercise exceptional gifts is certain fields.

We make a mistake when we try to apply that same truth in the spiritual realm.  Those who excel spiritually aren’t those who are especially gifted to do so.  Rather it is those who give attention and effort in areas within the grasp of each of us.

Take the tongue for instance.  Our inability to completely and finally control our tongues is readily acknowledged.  But one who works on it diligently and consistently has gone a very long way in controlling the whole body (Jas. 3:2).  Earlier James said that making a claim to being religious while failing to bridle one’s tongue renders the entire venture worthless.

Every one of us has a tongue, every one of us speaks, every one of us employs words in our communication. Not every one of works on controlling their tongue.  It’s not a matter of some special capacity with which one endowed, but the will and determination to do what would please God regarding this “small member”.

If one is interested in exceptional spirituality, the tongue is a very good place to begin.

Life Loved and Good Days

Devotional Text: 1 Peter 3:10

Who could ask for anything more?  Really?  To be able to say that one loves the life they live and that their days are good, would be the dream of so many people.  It would be so much better than the frustration and aggravation they feel presently dominates their lives.  And let’s face it, we’ve all had too many of the days that are anything but good.

Ok, so how does one get there?  How do we achieve what everyone wants?  That answer is likely as surprising as it is old.  Peter quotes from Psalms 34 for the answer.  The one who “desires to love life and see good days” should do some specific things.  These include:
• watch what you say—“keep his tongue from evil and his lips from speaking deceit”
• be careful to do good—“let him turn away from evil and do good”
• make peace a priority—“let him seek peace and pursue it”  (1 Peter 3:10-11).

Had you been asked about the course of action for loving life would any of these been on your list?  Is it not telling that what would lead to what we want, is so neglected or at least minimized?

Think about how these three impact the relationships of our lives.  Is not our joy and pleasure in life directly related to the condition of our relationships?  Our focus becomes more of providing an atmosphere where we can enjoy the love, companionship, and interaction with friends, family, and loved ones instead of getting what we want.

Whoever desires to love life and see good days; that’s me!

–David Deffenbaugh

For today’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

The Surprising Path to Spiritual Excellence

Devotional Text: James 3:2

The gulf is quite expansive that spans the difference between my talents and abilities and those of a professional athlete, musician, painter, etc. They are what they are because they possess and exercise t exceptional gifts is certain fields.

We make a mistake when we try to apply that same truth in the spiritual realm.  Those who excel spiritually aren’t those who are especially gifted to do so.  Rather it is those who give attention and effort in areas within the grasp of each of us.

Take the tongue for instance.  Our inability to completely and finally control our tongues is readily acknowledged.  But one who works on it diligently and consistently has gone a very long way in controlling the whole body (Jas. 3:2).  Earlier James said that making a claim to being religious while failing to bridle one’s tongue renders the entire venture worthless (Jas. 1:26).

Everyone of us has a tongue, everyone of us speaks, everyone of us employ words in our communication. Not everyone of works on controlling their tongue.  It’s not a matter of some special capacity with which one endowed, but the will and determination to do what would please God regarding this “small member”.

If one is interested in exceptional spirituality, the tongue is a very good place to begin.

–David Deffenbaugh

For today’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE

What Comes Out of Your Mouth

The mouth is the bucket that brings up what is in the well of our hearts.  (I can’t take credit for that thought, but I don’t know to whom credit is due.)

A very good indicator of the genuine interest and concern and focus of our lives is what we talk about.

Think about that in terms of your every day speech and your relationship with God.  Are the names of God and Jesus on your lips daily?  Is praise of Him and the telling of His great love for us reserved only for certain places and times and in certain company?

Listen to the opening lines of Psalm 34:
I will bless the LORD at all times;
his praise shall continually be in my mouth.
My soul makes its boast in the LORD;
let the humble hear and be glad.
Oh, magnify the LORD with me,
and let us exalt his name together!
(Psalm 34:1-3)

This certainly is behind the otherwise curious statement God made to Joshua when commissioning him as Moses’ successor to lead Israel into Canaan.  He charged him to keep all the Law which Moses had given, not to turn from it to the right or the left, to meditate on it day and night, and that it “shall not depart from your mouth” (Josh.1:7-8).

What we love we think about, and what we think about we talk about.

How does God fit in that formula for you?

–David Deffenbaugh

For today’s Bible reading introduction CLICK HERE